Price: € 16.00
WWE 1CD 31876
Listen to
George Crumb
Gnomic Variations
Gnomic Variations 19:21
Processional 10:08
Ancient Voices of Chidren - El nino busca su voz 04:12
- Dances of the Ancient Voice 02:36
- Me he perdido muchas veces por el mar 02:27
- De donde vienes, amor, mi nino= 03:40
- Todas las tardes en Granada. todas las tardes se muere un nino 02:28
- Ghost Dance 01:58
- Se ha Ilenado de luces mi corazon de seda 06:48
Total Time 53:38
George Crumb, Gnomic Variations_Processional_Ancient voices of children 9,99 €  |  download
02 George Crumb - Processional 10:24
03 George Crumb - The little boy was looking for his voice 04:18
04 George Crumb - Dances of the ancient voice 02:36
05 George Crumb - I have lost myself in the see many times 02:31
06 George Crumb - Dance of the sacred life-cycle 03:40
07 George Crumb - Each afternoon in Granada 02:35
08 George Crumb - Ghost Dance 02:03
09 George Crumb - My heart of silk is filled with lights 06:48
On reading the title Gnomic Variations, lovers of piano music might fancy themselves to be in a kind of "Grieg's World," but the truth is far from it: the title of the piano solo, completed in 1981, does not refer to any thieving Irish gnomes but solely to the conciseness of the structure of the work. "Gnomic" here means expressing an idea in brief words, or, simply, describing a maxim as accurately as possible. The Gnomic Variations consist of three parts, comprising a total of 18 variations. Although the pianist obtains the sounds also from the innermost part of the piano, directly from the strings, the instrument is nevertheless not prepared thus the effects have to be generated new in each instance. Processional (1983) derives its force from the contrast between structure and tone color, with no or only few alternative styles of play being allowed. And the five songs (and two instrumental intermezzi) in Ancient Voices of Children (1970), Crumb's intricate and colorful adaptation of poems by Lorca, involves not only both a boy-soprano and a mezzo-soprano but instruments as unusual as a toy piano, a harp or a musical saw.
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